The Great Pyramid of Giza
 

 

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the most extraordinary structure built in the ancient world. Its complex engineering and perfect design are an attribute to the master craftsmen that carved its flawless stones. It stands in the sands of time as a symbol of the eternal house it was built to represent, but was the Great Pyramid built as a tomb for the great Pharaoh Khufu as most historians believe, or did the ancient Egyptian monks keep their darkest secrets encased in the stone structure?

Built around 2,170 B.C. the Great Pyramid stood as the tallest building in the world for over 3,000 years. It towers around 481 feet and it is constructed with 2.5 million limestone blocks. It’s walls are solid limestone and it’s measurements are inexplicably precise. Its four walls face exactly north, south, east, and west, to one tenth of a degree and the sides of the walls are the same length, within eight inches.

But for all the glory and mastery of architecture that was put into the Great Pyramids construction, the inside is as bleak and empty as a lifeless cave. The only human object found in the Pyramid was an empty sarcophagus, or coffin, without even a lid.

In 800 B.C., a wealthy treasure hunter from Bagdad named Caliph al Mamoun decided to investigate the tales of treasure buried in the Pyramid. He formed a crew and ventured off to Egypt to break into the Pyramid of Giza. When he arrived at the Pyramid he was confronted by four mighty walls of solid stone with no apparent entry into the structure. He ordered his men to begin digging right through the base.

For days the men toiled in the hot Egyptian sun, digging and cutting through the solid limestone of the Great Pyramid. After chiseling one hundred feet into the wall, Caliph's workers were ready to call it quits, until alas they heard the sound of a stone falling into a hallowed area from inside the pyramid. At Caliph's orders, the crew pushed forward and they finally broke through into the passage that leads into the subterranean chamber of the pyramid.

Caliph al Mamoun and his men scrambled through the Great Pyramid, desperately searching for the treasure of legend. They ran through both chambers, and in each chamber they found nothing. In the king’s chamber, they found the empty, lidless coffin.

Fearing mutiny, Caliph penned home to his father and pleaded for him to bring money. When the chest of money and treasure arrived, Caliph had it buried in the sand before the pyramid.  When his men awoke, he ordered them to begin digging where he had "a vision." His men praised Caliph’s foresight and were content to find a treasure with exactly enough money to cover the wages for their fruitless endeavor.

 

Was the Great Pyramid a Tomb?

Probably the most disappointing find of the Great Pyramid was the King’s Chamber? As glorious as this tomb is on the outside, the chamber Pharaoh Cheops was allegedly laid to rest in is as bleak and empty as a prison cell. There were no paintings on the walls, no hieroglyphs telling stories of the pharaoh's life, and no treasures the Pharaoh could take to his afterlife as was found in every other pyramid. The biggest mystery of all is the absence of the Pharaoh's mummified body.

The common theory is that the great pyramid was victim to grave robberies before Caliph chiseled through its solid core, but there is hardly a legitimate explanation as to how these alleged robbers gained entry into the pyramid, after all, it was sealed on all four sides when Caliph arrived in 800 B.C.

Most scholars agree that the pyramid was closed from the inside leaving no known exits. There is one small tunnel called "Greave's Shaft" that leads down to the subterranean chamber, but the subterranean chamber does not have an exterior exit. It there were an exit from the subterranean chamber to the outside it is possible that it was filled with sand over a couple thousand years, but the lid of the king's coffin was too large to fit through Greaves Shaft. 

 

 

 

The Secrets of the Great Pyramid of Giza

The answer is simple. The pyramid was not a tomb. Its walls have no paintings or hieroglyphs because it’s meant to be dark. The Great Pyramid of Giza was built as the first temple dedicated to the Ancient Mysteries. The Great Pyramid was an ancient labyrinth where the hierophants and priests of Eygpy initiated young adepts into the mysterious rituals and rites of the Eygptian Mysteries.

This explains why the king's sarcophagus is also void of paintings and decorations, but every other pyramid tomb is highly decorated with stories of their inhabitant's lives. Could it be that the lidless coffin was just an instrument for ancient initation ceremonies.

In the initiation of the third degree of Freemasonry, the candidate is blindfolded and led into the darkness of the Masonic temple. The candidate undergoes a reenactment of the murder of Hiram Abiff. During this reenactment, the candidate himself is “murdered,” then placed in a coffin, before finally being resurrected from the darkness of unknowing, into the light of Freemasonry.

In the same way, the candidate that was initiated into the mysteries of the Ancient Egyptian Mystery School was brought into the subterranean chamber of the Great Pyramid, where ancient rites were performed. There were two levels of of completion in the Egyptian School of Mysteries, the Lesser Mysteries and the Greater Mysteries.

The candidate learned the allegories of the Lesser Mysteries in the subterranean chamber. The lower chamber represented the labyrinth of illusions man must ovecome as the soul of man wanders in the lower world in search for truth.

When he was ready to learn the the secrets of the second degree, the candidate was lead up to the Grand Gallery, all the while being confronted by his initiators in the darkness. The candidate made it to the Queens Chamber and couldn’t go further until passing tests of wisdom and discipline. Only after the candidate completed rites of passage in the Queens chamber and showed moral and physical courage along with a deep understanding of the laws of nature and astrology, would he be allowed entry into the Greater Mysteries, the King's Chamber.

In the King’s Chamber, the candidate underwent the rites of he Greater Mysteries and was instructed in the wisdom passed down ages beore by Thoth Hermes Trismegistus, the communicator of the gods. During the rite of the Greater Mysteries, the candidate was laid in the lidless sarcophagus, for there was no need for a lid when the candidate was sure to be resurrected. It was there in the King's Chamber that he was raised from the sacrophagus and resurrected from the coffin into spiritual enlightenment, just as in Freemasonry.

If the Great Pyramid was a tomb, then why would the ancients have built ventilation shafts into the burial chambers? Why would the Egyptians go through so much trouble to mummify and preserve their pharaoh, just to destroy them with oxygen from outside, the one element they tried so hard to protect against? Why were there no hieroglyphs and paintings in the Great Pyramid as was in every other pyramid in Egypt. The Pyramid of Giza wasn't a tomb for the pharaoh Cheops, but a temple for the ancient priests to study the Mysteries and Wisdom written down ages before by Thoth Hermes Trismegistus.

 

 
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